The University of Chicago News Office
September 28, 1995 Press Contact: Steve Koppes
(773) 702-8366
s-koppes@uchicago.edu
 

Highest-energy cosmic rays may be signature of early universe

Join a space-shuttle astronaut, four Nobel laureates, a congressman and the director of the National Science Foundation for a symposium on the future of science and technology in the 21st century. The two-day symposium on the University of Chicago campus, free and open to the public, is in honor of the 50th anniversaries of the University’s James Franck and Enrico Fermi Institutes. It will be held Thursday and Friday, Oct. 19 and 20.

The Research Institutes are two of the oldest centers for interdisciplinary scientific research in the world. In the Institutes, physicists, chemists, astronomers, geophysicists, materials scientists and mathematicians work together to solve problems that transcend traditional disciplinary boundaries.

The symposium, titled “Interdisciplinary Science and Technology: Past Experience and Prospects for the Twenty-first Century” will be held in the Max Palevsky Cinema, Ida Noyes Hall, 1212 E. 59th St. For more information, call (773) 702-2503.

"Doomsday Clock” setting to be debated at Bulletin’s 50th, Dec. 7-8 Research Institutes’ 50th anniversary, Oct. 19-20

Join a space-shuttle astronaut, four Nobel laureates, a congressman and the director of the National Science Foundation for a symposium on the future of science and technology in the 21st century. The two-day symposium on the University of Chicago campus, free and open to the public, is in honor of the 50th anniversaries of the University’s James Franck and Enrico Fermi Institutes. It will be held Thursday and Friday, Oct. 19 and 20.

The Research Institutes are two of the oldest centers for interdisciplinary scientific research in the world. In the Institutes, physicists, chemists, astronomers, geophysicists, materials scientists and mathematicians work together to solve problems that transcend traditional disciplinary boundaries.

The symposium, titled “Interdisciplinary Science and Technology: Past Experience and Prospects for the Twenty-first Century” will be held in the Max Palevsky Cinema, Ida Noyes Hall, 1212 E. 59th St. For more information, call (773) 702-2503.

"Doomsday Clock” setting to be debated at Bulletin’s 50th, Dec. 7-8

The “Doomsday Clock,” which has served since 1947 as a symbol of the threat of nuclear destruction, may be reset in December for the first time since 1991. And for the first time ever, the debate over its setting will be conducted as a public forum.

The debate-titled “What Time Is It?”-is being held in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. The Bulletin, founded in 1945 at the University of Chicago, is the originator of the “Doomsday Clock.” The forum will be held Thursday and Friday, Dec. 7 and 8, and is free and open to the public.

The clock currently stands at 17 minutes to midnight, although in 1953 it came as close as two minutes to midnight after both the United States and the Soviet Union successfully tested hydrogen bombs.

The debate will be held in the Max Palevsky Cinema, Ida Noyes Hall, 1212 E. 59th St. For more information, call (773) 702-2555.

 

http://www-news.uchicago.edu/releases/95/950928.science.future.shtml
Last modified at 03:50 PM CST on Wednesday, June 14, 2000.

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