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CEMSE and Illinois Science Council to host science talk series

Oct. 3, 2007

As part of Chicago Science in the City 2007, The University of Chicago’s Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE), in partnership with the Illinois Science Council (ISC), will offer a series of science talks that are open to the public. Chicago Science in the City 2007 runs from October 2 - 13 in universities, laboratories, museums, office buildings, parks and public spaces throughout the Chicagoland area.

“The aim of this program is to give people who have an interest in science, but do not necessary work in the sciences, an opportunity to hear from top experts in their respective fields about cutting edge research and technology that affects their daily lives,” said Jeanne Century, Director of Science Education, Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education. Century was on the planning committee for this city-wide event and worked closely with the Illinois Science Council to plan the series.

The CEMSE/ISC series includes:

PAUL SERENO ON DINOSAUR SCIENCE
Tuesday, October 2, 6:30-8:00pm
Chicago Cultural Center, 78 E. Washington Dinosaur science is alive and well! From DNA to feathers, dinosaur fossils are yielding some of the most interesting clues as to how life evolves on Earth. Paul Sereno, professor of paleontology at The University of Chicago, details this breaking science and his current research and expeditions.

CANCER CAUSING VIRUSES
Wednesday, October 3, 6-7:30pm
Uncommon Ground Restaurant, 1214 W. Grace at Clark Street

Ken Alexander, Chief of Pediatric Infectious Disease at Comer Children’s Hospital, explains how viruses are implicated in causing some cancers. How contagious are these viruses? What can we do to protect ourselves? Dr. Alexander’s lab specializes in the study of the human papillomavirus (HPV) infections.

BSI – THE CASE OF THE DISAPPEARING BEES
Thursday, October 4, 6-7:00pm
Chicago Cultural Center, 78 E. Washington

Over the past year, the mysterious disappearance of one-third of America’s honey bees – what has become known as colony collapse disorder – has focused attention on how little is known about U.S. pollinators and how dependent we are upon them. May Berenbaum, Professor and Head of the Department of Entomology at the University of Illinois, will discuss the pollinator crisis, the plight of the honey bee, and advances in entomology that provide hope for the future of America’s bees.

THE DOOMSDAY CLOCK: WHY ARE WE AT 5 MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT?
Saturday, October 6, 2-3:30pm
Hyde Park Borders Bookstore, 1539 E. 53rd Street

For more than 60 years, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist’s Doomsday Clock has charted how close the world stands to nuclear peril. In January, the hands of The Clock were moved forward to 5 minutes to midnight. Find out why experts fear the world may be entering a second “nuclear age” from Jonas Siegel, editor of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist, and Josh Schollmeyer, editor of the Bulletin Online.

CSI: CHICAGO – FORENSIC SCIENCE BY THE EXPERTS
Saturday, October 6, 2-4:00pm
Chicago Cultural Center, 78 E. Washington

Janet Girten, Deputy Laboratory Director of the Forensic Science Center at Chicago, will present the real facts about forensics evidence versus how Hollywood portrays it. She will explain how forensics experts do their work and give examples from real crime scenes.

Linda Klepinger, Emeritus Professor of Anthropology at the University of Illinois, will explain how forensic anthropologists extract information from skeletons for medical, legal, and mass disaster investigations. She will discuss how experts can shed light on a person’s age, gender, and even the cause of death from only skeletal remains.

Ken Alder, Director of the Science in Human Culture Program at Northwestern University, will discuss his recent book “The Lie Detectors: The History of an American Obsession.” Using the history of the American polygraph, he examines the relationship between science and justice in the twentieth century.

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF LIFE: THE WORLDWIDE BIODIVERSITY PROJECT
Tuesday, October 9, 12:30-2:00pm
Borders Bookstore on State, 150 N. State Street

Mark Westneat, curator of zoology at The Field Museum, will speak about this ambitious and fascinating project. This $50 million biodiversity effort will create the “Encyclopedia of Life” – an authoritative version of Wikipedia for biology fans – documenting all 1.8 million named species of animals, plants, and other forms of life on Earth. Potential applications range from planning natural conservation in suburban subdivisions, to mapping coral reefs in the Pacific, to identifying that odd butterfly perched by your backyard window.

ARE WE READY FOR GENETIC MEDICINE? IT’S ALREADY HERE!
Tuesday, October 9, 6-7:00pm
Chicago Cultural Center, 78 E. Washington

Rex L. Chisholm, PhD, is the Director of Northwestern University’s Center for Genetic Medicine. He will explain what the world learned from the Human Genome Project, how genetic research and discoveries are impacting disease diagnosis, the benefits and limitations of genetic testing, and the future of medical treatment being customized for your genes.

IS IT THE GENES OR JUST THE JEANS?-THE BIOLOGY OF GENDER
Thursday, October 11, 6-7:30pm
Chicago Cultural Center, 78 E. Washington

Do we learn to be male/female, or are we programmed that way? Anatomical differences are obvious, but an increasing body of research also shows that the sexes think differently, perceive pain differently, and even encode memories differently. Mark Osadjan, professor of biology at The University of Chicago, will discuss the biology of the sexes, from genes to behavior and beyond. Join us to see what science says about these issues.

CEMSE is a Research and Development Center that resides within the Physical Sciences Division (PSD) of the University of Chicago. CEMSE continues the University of Chicago’s long-standing commitment to improving precollege education and aims to support high quality mathematics and science instruction and learning for all students. Through the sharing of knowledge and the creation of useful products and programs, CEMSE seeks to make a positive difference for mathematics and science instruction throughout the nation.


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Last modified at 10:28 AM CST on Thursday, October 04, 2007

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