The University of Chicago News Office
Feb. 23, 2006 Press Contact: William Harms
(773) 702-8356
w-harms@uchicago.edu
 

Artifacts from Nubia

Some of the world’s most significant artifacts from Nubia, an ancient African civilization that had important connections to Egypt, will go on display Saturday, Feb. 25, at the Museum of the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago, 1155 E. 58th St.

Many of the artifacts, including one of the world’s oldest saddles, will be on display for the first time as the museum opens “Ancient Nubia” in the Robert F. Picken Family Nubian Gallery.

Photographs taken during University expeditions 100 years ago in Nubia, now Sudan, also will be on display. The photographs show remote archaeological sites and scenes of daily life. “Lost Nubia: Photographs of Egypt and the Sudan 1905-07” will be exhibited in the Marshall and Doris Holleb Family Gallery for Special Exhibits until Sunday, May 7. READ MORE


Click the images below to obtain a high-resolution/print photograph for download.

  Meroitic jar depicting cobras
The Meroitic kingdom ruled in Nubia from about 300 B.C. to about 300 A.D.

 

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  Incense burner
The Qustul incense burner from a tomb in Nubia, about 3100 B.C.

 

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  Bronze statuette of a Napatan king
The Napatan rulers of Nubia conquered Egypt in the 8th century B.C.

 

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  Nubian pyramids of the Meroitic period at Gebel Barkal
Photograph taken during the University of Chicago Expedition to Egypt and Sudan in 1906. The pyramids were built from about 100 B.C. to 150 A.D.

 

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   Stephen Harvey, Assistant Professor in the Oriental Institute, and co-curator of “Ancient Nubia” looks over the display cases in the new Robert F. Picken Family Gallery at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago.

 

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  Geoff Emberling, Director of the Museum of the Oriental Institute.

 

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  Gil Stein, Director of the Oriental Institute, surveys a display case as curators prepare “Ancient Nubia” at the Museum of the Oriental Institute.

 

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  Rock temple
A photograph taken in 1906 of the rock temple of Ramesses II at Abu Simbel in ancient Nubia.

 

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   King Thutmose
A photographer for the University of Chicago expedition to Nubia and Egypt photographing an inscription on a stella of Egyptian King Thutmose opposite the Island of Tumbos on the Nile. The photo was taken in 1907.

 

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http://www-news.uchicago.edu/releases/06/060223.nubia-photos.shtml
Last modified at 02:58 PM CST on Wednesday, February 22, 2006.

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